Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-50
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-50
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 11 Mar 2020

Submitted as: research article | 11 Mar 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal BG.

Examining the link between vegetation leaf area and land-atmosphere exchange of water, energy, and carbon fluxes using FLUXNET data

Anne J. Hoek van Dijke1,2,3, Kaniska Mallick1, Martin Schlerf1, Miriam Machwitz1, Martin Herold2, and Adriaan J. Teuling3 Anne J. Hoek van Dijke et al.
  • 1Remote Sensing and Natural resources Modeling, Department ERIN, Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology (LIST), Belvaux, Luxembourg
  • 2Laboratory of Geo-Information Science and Remote Sensing, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, the Netherlands
  • 3Hydrology and Quantitative Water Management Group, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, the Netherlands

Abstract. Vegetation regulates the exchange of water, energy, and carbon fluxes between the land and the atmosphere. This regulation of surface fluxes differs with vegetation type and climate, but the effect of vegetation on surface fluxes is not well understood. A better knowledge of how and when vegetation influences surface fluxes could improve climate models and the extrapolation of ground-based water, energy, and carbon fluxes. We aim to study the large-scale link between vegetation and surface fluxes by combining MODIS leaf area index with flux tower measurements of water (latent heat), energy (sensible heat), and carbon (gross primary productivity and net ecosystem exchange). We show that the correlation between leaf area index and water and energy fluxes depends on vegetation and aridity. In water-limited conditions, the link between vegetation and water and energy fluxes is strong, which is in line with a strong stomatal or vegetation control found in earlier studies. In energy-limited forest we found no vegetation control on water and energy fluxes. In contrast to water and energy fluxes, we found a strong correlation between leaf area index and gross primary productivity that was independent of vegetation type and aridity index. This study provides insight in the large-scale link between vegetation and surface fluxes. The study indicates that for modelling or extrapolating large-scale surface fluxes, LAI can be useful in savanna and grassland, but only of limited use in deciduous broadleaf forest and evergreen needleleaf forest.

Anne J. Hoek van Dijke et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 22 Apr 2020)
Status: open (until 22 Apr 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Anne J. Hoek van Dijke et al.

Anne J. Hoek van Dijke et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 205 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
146 58 1 205 2 6
  • HTML: 146
  • PDF: 58
  • XML: 1
  • Total: 205
  • BibTeX: 2
  • EndNote: 6
Views and downloads (calculated since 11 Mar 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 11 Mar 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 99 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 98 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 05 Apr 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
We investigated the link between vegetation leaf area index and land-atmosphere exchange of water, energy, and carbon fluxes. We show that the correlation between leaf area index and water and energy fluxes depends on vegetation type and aridity. For carbon fluxes, however, the correlation with leaf area index was strong, independent of vegetation and aridity. This study provides insight in when vegetation leaf area index can be used to model or extrapolate large-scale land-atmosphere fluxes.
We investigated the link between vegetation leaf area index and land-atmosphere exchange of...
Citation