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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-499
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-499
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: technical note 20 Jan 2020

Submitted as: technical note | 20 Jan 2020

Review status
A revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal BG and is expected to appear here in due course.

Technical note: Facilitating the use of low-cost methane (CH4) sensors in flux chambers – calibration, data processing, and an open source make-it-yourself logger

David Bastviken, Jonatan Nygren, Jonathan Schenk, Roser Parellada Massana, and Nguyen Thanh Duc David Bastviken et al.
  • Department of Thematic Studies – Environmental Change, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping, Sweden

Abstract. A major bottleneck regarding the efforts to better quantify greenhouse gas fluxes, map sources and sinks, and understand flux regulation, is the shortage of low-cost and accurate-enough measurement methods. The studies of methane (CH4) – a long-lived greenhouse gas increasing rapidly but irregularly in the atmosphere for unclear reasons, and with poorly understood source-sink attribution – suffer from such method limitations. This study present new calibration and data processing approaches for use of a low-cost CH4 sensor in flux chambers. Results show that the change in relative CH4 levels can be determined at rather high accuracy in the 2–700 ppm range, with modest efforts of collecting reference samples in situ, and without continuous access to expensive reference instruments. These results open for more affordable and time-effective measurements of CH4 in flux chambers. To facilitate such measurements, we also provide a description for building and using an Arduino logger for CH4, carbon dioxide (CO2), humidity, and temperature.

David Bastviken et al.

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Interactive discussion

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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David Bastviken et al.

David Bastviken et al.

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Latest update: 07 Jul 2020
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Short summary
This study presents a low-cost way to measure methane emissions being applicable in nature and society. This facilitates widespread and affordable methane measurements, which are greatly needed for verifying that greenhouse gas mitigation is effective, and for improved quantification of fluxes and how they are regulated. The paper also describe an open-source do-it-yourself methane-carbon dioxide-humidity-temperature logger, to increase the distributed capacity to measure greenhouse gases.
This study presents a low-cost way to measure methane emissions being applicable in nature and...
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