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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-46
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-46
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 01 Mar 2019

Submitted as: research article | 01 Mar 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Biogeosciences (BG) and is expected to appear here in due course.

Biological enhancement of mineral weathering by Pinus sylvestris seedlings – effects of plants, ectomycorrhizal fungi, and elevated CO2

Nicholas P. Rosenstock1,a, Patrick A. W. van Hees2,b, Petra M. A. Fransson1, Roger D. Finlay1, and Anna Rosling1,c Nicholas P. Rosenstock et al.
  • 1Department of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology, Uppsala BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, 750 07, Sweden
  • 2Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre, Örebro University, Örebro, 701 82, Sweden
  • apresent address: Center for Environmental and Climate Research, Lund University, Lund, 232 62, Sweden
  • bpresent address: Eurofins Environment Sweden AB, Lidköping, 531 17, Sweden
  • cpresent address: Department of Ecology and Genetics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, 752 36, Sweden

Abstract. Better understanding and quantifying the relative influence of plants, associated mycorrhizal fungi, and abiotic factors such as elevated CO2 on biotic weathering is essential to constraining weathering estimates. We employed a column microcosm system to examine the effects of elevated CO2 and Pinus sylvestris seedlings, with or without the ectomycorrhizal fungi Piloderma fallax and Suillus variegatus, on rhizosphere soil solution concentrations of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) and weathering of primary minerals. Seedlings significantly increased mineral weathering, as estimated from elemental budgets of Ca, K, Mg, and Si. Elevated CO2 increased plant growth and LMWOA concentrations, but had no effect on weathering. Colonization by ectomycorrhizal fungi, particularly P. fallax, showed some tendency to increase weathering. LMWOA concentrations correlated with seedling biomass across both CO2 and mycorrhizal treatments, but not with total weathering. We conclude that nutrient uptake, which reduces transport limitation to weathering, is the primary mechanism by which plants enhanced weathering in this system. While the experimental system used departs from conditions in forest soils in a number of ways, these results are in line with weathering studies performed at the ecosystem, macrocosm, and microcosm scale, indicating that nutrient uptake by plants and microbes is an important biological mechanism by which mineral weathering is enhanced.

Nicholas P. Rosenstock et al.
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Interactive discussion
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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Nicholas P. Rosenstock et al.
Nicholas P. Rosenstock et al.
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Short summary
We examined the effects of elevated CO2, pine seedlings, and ectomycorrhizal fungi on mineral weathering. Seedlings significantly increased mineral weathering, while elevated CO2 increased plant growth and organic acid concentrations, but had no effect on weathering. Ectomycorrhial fungi showed some tendency to increase weathering. We conclude that nutrient uptake, which reduces transport limitation to weathering, is the primary mechanism by which plants enhanced weathering in this system.
We examined the effects of elevated CO2, pine seedlings, and ectomycorrhizal fungi on mineral...
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