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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-416
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-416
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 11 Nov 2019

Submitted as: research article | 11 Nov 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG).

Changes in Particulate and Mineral Associated Organic Carbon with Land Use in Contrasting Soils

Sabina Yeasmin1,a, Balwant Singh1, Cliff T. Johnston2, Donald L. Sparks3, and Quan Hua4 Sabina Yeasmin et al.
  • 1Sydney Institute of Agriculture, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
  • 2Crop, Soil and Environmental Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
  • 3Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
  • 4Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232, Australia
  • acurrent address: Department of Agronomy, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh

Abstract. Soil organic carbon (OC) is the largest terrestrial C stock and soils' capacity to preserve OC varies with many factors including land use, soil type and depth. We investigated the effect of land use change on particulate organic matter (POM) and mineral-associated organic matter (MOM) in soils. Surface (0–10 cm) and sub-surface (60–70 cm) soil samples were collected from paired-sites (native and cropped lands) of four contrasting soils. Bulk soils were isolated into POM and MOM fractions, which were analysed for mineralogy, OC and nitrogen, isotopic signatures and 14C content. POMs of surface soils were relatively unaffected by land use change, possibly because of continuous input of crop residues, while corresponding POM in sub-surface lost more OC. In surface soils, oxides-dominated MOM lost more OC than phyllosilicates- and quartz -dominated MOM, which is attributed to diverse OM input and the extent of OC saturation limit of soils. In contrast, oxides-associated fractions were less affected in the sub-surface soils than the other two MOM fractions, possibly due to OC protection via organo–mineral associations. Changed isotopic signature (linked with vegetation) across the fractions suggested that fresh crop residues constituted the bulk of OM in surface soils (supported by greater 14C). Increased isotopic signatures and lower 14C in sub-surface MOM fractions suggested the association of more microbially processed, aged OC in oxides-rich fractions than other MOMs. Results reveal that quantity and quality of OC after land use change was influenced by the nature of C input in surface soils and by mineral-organic association in sub-surface soils.

Sabina Yeasmin et al.
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Short summary
This study demonstrated impact of land use change on organic carbon (OC) pools in four soils with contrasting mineralogy for both surface and sub-surface depths. Bulk soils were isolated into particulate and mineral associated OC by density fractionation, and analysed for mineralogy, OC, nitrogen and isotopic signatures. Results reveal that quantity and quality of OC after land use change was influenced by nature of C input in surface soils and by mineral-organic association in sub-surface soils.
This study demonstrated impact of land use change on organic carbon (OC) pools in four soils...
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