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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-249
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-249
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: ideas and perspectives 09 Jul 2019

Submitted as: ideas and perspectives | 09 Jul 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG).

Proposed Best Practices for Collaboration at Cross-disciplinary Observatories

Jason Philip Kaye1, Susan Louise Brantley2,3, Jennifer Zan Williams3, and the SSHCZO team* Jason Philip Kaye et al.
  • 1Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
  • 2Department of Geosciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
  • 3Earth and Environmental Systems Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
  • *A full list of authors and their affiliations appears at the end of the paper.

Abstract. Interdisciplinary science affords new opportunities but also presents new challenges for biogeosciences collaboration. Since 2007, we have conducted site-based interdisciplinary research in central PA, USA at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory. Early in our collaboration, we realized the need for some best practices that could guide our project team. While we found some guidelines for determining authorship on papers, we found fewer guidelines describing how to collaboratively establish field sites, share instrumentation, share model code, and share data. Thus, we worked as a team to develop a best practices document that is presented here. While this work is based on one large team project, we think many of the themes are universal and we present our example to provide a building block for improving the function of interdisciplinary biogeoscience teams.

Jason Philip Kaye et al.
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Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Jason Philip Kaye et al.
Jason Philip Kaye et al.
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Short summary
Interdisciplinary teams can only capitalize on innovative ideas if members work well together through collegial and efficient use of field sites, instrumentation, samples, data, and model code. Thus, biogeoscience teams may benefit from developing a set of best practices for collaboration. We present one such example from a the Susquehanna-Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory. Many of the themes from our example are universal and they offer insights useful to other biogeoscience teams.
Interdisciplinary teams can only capitalize on innovative ideas if members work well together...
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