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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-243
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-243
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 30 Oct 2019

Submitted as: research article | 30 Oct 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG).

Vertical transport of sediment-associated metals and cyanobacteria by ebullition in a stratified lake

Kyle Delwiche1,a, Junyao Gu2, Harold Hemond1, and Sarah P. Preheim2 Kyle Delwiche et al.
  • 1Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
  • 2Department of Environmental Health and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
  • acurrently at: Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract. Bubbles adsorb and transport particulate matter both in industrial and marine systems. While methane-containing bubbles emitted from anoxic sediments are found extensively in aquatic ecosystems, relatively little attention has been paid to the possibility that such bubbles transport particle-associated chemical or biological material from sediments to surface waters of freshwater lakes. We quantified transport of particulate material from sediments to the surface by bubbles in Upper Mystic Lake, MA and in a 15 m tall experimental column. Vertical particle transport was positively correlated with the volume of gas bubbles released from the sediment. Particles transported by bubbles originated almost entirely in the sediment, rather than being scavenged from the water column. Concentrations of arsenic, chromium, lead, and cyanobacterial cells in bubble-transported particulate material were similar to those of bulk sediment, and particles were transported from depths exceeding 15 m, resulting in daily fluxes as large as 0.005 µmol of arsenic m−2 and 4 × 104 cyanobacterial cells m−2 in the strongly stratified Upper Mystic Lake. While bubble-facilitated arsenic transport currently appears to be a modest component of total arsenic cycling in this lake, bubble-facilitated cyanobacterial transport could comprise as much as 17 % of recruitment in this lake and may thus be of particular importance in large, deep, stratified lakes.

Kyle Delwiche et al.
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Kyle Delwiche et al.
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Data Associated with publication "Vertical transport of sediment-associated metals and cyanobacteria by ebullition in a stratified lake" K. Delwiche, J. Gu, H. Hemond, and S. Preheim https://doi.org/10.7281/T1/7WXPIN

Kyle Delwiche et al.
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Short summary
In this study, we investigate whether bubbles transport sediments containing arsenic and cyanobacteria from the bottom to the top of a polluted lake. We measured arsenic and cyanobacteria from bubble traps in the lake and from an experimental bubble column in the laboratory. We found that bubble transport was not an important source of arsenic in the surface waters, but that bubbles could transport enough cyanobacteria to the surface to exacerbate harmful algal blooms.
In this study, we investigate whether bubbles transport sediments containing arsenic and...
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