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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-229
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-229
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 05 Jul 2019

Research article | 05 Jul 2019

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG).

Tracing the sources of dissolved organic carbon occurring in a coastal bay surrounded by heavily industrialized cities using stable carbon isotopes

Shin-Ah Lee1, Tae-Hoon Kim2, and Guebuem Kim1 Shin-Ah Lee et al.
  • 1Schoolof Earth and Environmental Sciences/Research Institute of Oceanography, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea
  • 2Department of Earth and Marine Sciences, Jeju National University, Jeju, 63243, Republic of Korea

Abstract. The sources of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in coastal waters are diverse, and they play different roles in biogeochemistry and ecosystems. In this study, we measured dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON), δ13C-DOC, and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) in coastal bay waters surrounded by heavily industrialized cities (Masan Bay, Korea) to determine the different DOM sources in this region. The surface seawater samples were collected in two sampling campaigns (Aug. 2011 and Aug. 2016). The salinities ranged from 10 to 21 in 2011 and from 25.4 to 32 in 2016. In 2011, the excess DOC was observed for higher-salinity waters (16–21), indicating its main source from marine autochthonous production according to the δ13C-DOC values of −23.7 ‰ to −20.6 ‰, higher concentrations of protein-like FDOM, and lower DOC / DON (C / N) ratios. By contrast, the high DOC waters in high-salinity waters of 2016 were characterized by low FDOM, more depleted δ13C values of −28.8 ‰ to −21.1 ‰, and high C / N ratios, suggesting that the excess DOC is influenced by direct land-seawater interactions. Our results show that multiple DOM tracers such as δ13C-DOC, FDOM, and C / N ratios are powerful for discriminating the complicated sources of DOM in coastal waters.

Shin-Ah Lee et al.
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We differentiate the sources of DOM (terrestrial, marine autochthonous production, artificial island-seawater interaction) in coastal bay waters surrounded by heavily industrialized cities using multiple DOM tracers including dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON), stable carbon isotopes, fluorescent DOM, and DOC / DON ratio.
We differentiate the sources of DOM (terrestrial, marine autochthonous production, artificial...
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