Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-207
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-207
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: reviews and syntheses 30 Sep 2019

Submitted as: reviews and syntheses | 30 Sep 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG).

Reviews and syntheses: Marine biogenic aerosols and the ecophysiology of coral reefs

Rebecca Jackson1,2, Albert Gabric2,3, Roger Cropp1, and Matthew Woodhouse4 Rebecca Jackson et al.
  • 1School of Environment and Science, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia
  • 2Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia
  • 3School of Environment and Science, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD, Australia
  • 4Climate Science Centre, Oceans and Atmosphere, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Aspendale, VIC, Australia

Abstract. Coral reefs are being threatened by global climate change, with ocean warming and acidification, compounded by declining water quality in many coastal systems, adversely affecting coral health and cover. This is of great concern as coral reefs provide numerous ecosystem, economic and social services. Corals are also recognized as being amongst the strongest individual sources of natural atmospheric sulfur, through stress-induced emissions of dimethylsulfide (DMS). In the clean marine boundary layer, biogenic sulfates contribute to new aerosol formation and the growth of existing particles, with important implications for the radiative balance. Evidence suggests that DMS is not only directly involved in the coral stress response, alleviating oxidative stress, but may create an ocean thermostat which suppresses sea surface temperature (SST) through changes to aerosol and cloud properties. This review provides a summary of the current major threats facing coral reefs and describes the role of dimethylated sulfur compounds in coral physiology and climate. The role of coral reefs as a source of climatically important compounds is an emerging topic of research however, the window of opportunity to understand the complex biogeophysical processes involved is closing with ongoing degradation of the world's coral reefs. The greatest uncertainty in our estimates of radiative forcing and climate change are derived from natural aerosol sources, such as marine DMS, which constitutes the largest flux of oceanic reduced sulfur to the atmosphere. Gaining a better understanding of the role of coral reef DMS emissions is crucial to predicting the future climate of our planet.

Rebecca Jackson et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 11 Nov 2019)
Status: open (until 11 Nov 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Rebecca Jackson et al.
Rebecca Jackson et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 106 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
92 13 1 106 0 0
  • HTML: 92
  • PDF: 13
  • XML: 1
  • Total: 106
  • BibTeX: 0
  • EndNote: 0
Views and downloads (calculated since 30 Sep 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 30 Sep 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 84 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 82 with geography defined and 2 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 15 Oct 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Citation