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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-200
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-200
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 03 Jun 2019

Research article | 03 Jun 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG).

Anomalies in the Carbonate System of Red Sea Coastal Habitats

Kimberlee Baldry1,a, Vincent Saderne1, Daniel C. McCorkle2, James H. Churchill2, Susana Agusti1, and Carlos M. Duarte1 Kimberlee Baldry et al.
  • 1Red Sea Research Center and Computational Bioscience Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, 23955, Saudi Arabia
  • 2Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543, USA
  • acurrently at: Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7000, Australia

Abstract. We use observations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) to assess the impact of ecosystem metabolic processes on coastal waters of the eastern Red Sea. A simple, single-end-member mixing model is used to account for the influence of mixing with offshore waters and evaporation/precipitation, and to model ecosystem-driven perturbations on the carbonate system chemistry of coral reefs, seagrass meadows and mangrove forests. We find that (1) along-shelf changes in TA and DIC exhibit strong linear trends that are consistent with basin-scale net calcium carbonate precipitation; (2) ecosystem-driven changes in TA and DIC are larger than offshore variations in > 85 % of sampled seagrass meadows and mangrove forests, changes which are influenced by a combination of longer water residence times and community metabolic rates; and (3) the sampled mangrove forests show strong and consistent contributions from both organic respiration and other sedimentary processes (carbonate dissolution and secondary redox processes), while seagrass meadows display more variability in the relative contributions of photosynthesis and other sedimentary processes (carbonate precipitation and oxidative processes).

Kimberlee Baldry et al.
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Surface Carbonate Chemistry of the Red Sea (offshore and coastal) K. Baldry, V. Saderne, D. C. McCorkel, J. H. Churchill, S. Agusti, and C. M. Duarte https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.899850

Kimberlee Baldry et al.
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Short summary
The carbon cycling of coastal ecosystems over large spatial scales is not well measured relative to the open ocean. In this study we measure the carbonate system in the three habitats, to measure ecosystem-driven changes compared to offshore waters. We find (1) 85 % of seagrass meadows and mangrove forests show large ecosystem-driven changes and (2) mangrove forests show strong and consistent trends over large-scales, while seagrass meadows display more variability.
The carbon cycling of coastal ecosystems over large spatial scales is not well measured relative...
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