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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2018-532
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2018-532
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 14 Jan 2019

Research article | 14 Jan 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG).

Multiyear methane ebullition measurements from water and bare peat surfaces of a patterned boreal bog

Elisa Männistö1, Aino Korrensalo1, Pavel Alekseychik2, Ivan Mammarella2, Olli Peltola2, Timo Vesala2,3, and Eeva-Stiina Tuittila1 Elisa Männistö et al.
  • 1Peatland and soil ecology research group, School of Forest Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland
  • 2Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research/Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 68, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
  • 3Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research/Forest Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 27, 00014 Helsinki, Finland

Abstract. We measured methane ebullition from a patterned boreal bog situated in the Siikaneva wetland complex in southern Finland. Measurements were conducted on water (W) and bare peat surfaces (BP) in three growing seasons 2014–2016 using floating gas traps. The volume of the trapped gas was measured weekly, and methane and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations of bubbles were analyzed from fresh bubble samples collected separately. We applied a mixed effects model to quantify the effect of the environmental controlling factors on the ebullition.

Ebullition was higher from W than from BP, and more bubbles were released from open water (OW) than from water's edge (EW). On average, ebullition rate was the highest in the wettest year 2016 and ranged between 0–253 mg m−2 d−1, 0–147 mg m−2 d−1 and 0–186 mg m−2 d−1 in 2014, 2015 and 2016, respectively. Ebullition increased together with increasing peat temperature, weekly air temperature sum and atmospheric pressure, and decreasing water table (WT). Methane concentration in the bubbles released from W was 15–20 times higher and from BP 10 times higher than their CO2 concentration. The proportion of ebullition fluxes upscaled to ecosystem level for the peak season was 2–8 % and 2–5 % of the total flux measured with eddy covariance technique and with chambers and gas traps, respectively. Thus, the contribution of methane ebullition from wet non-vegetated surfaces of the bog to the total ecosystem-scale methane emission appeared to be small.

Elisa Männistö et al.
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Elisa Männistö et al.
Elisa Männistö et al.
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Short summary
We studied methane emitted as episodic bubble release (ebullition) from water and bare peat surfaces of a boreal bog in three subsequent years. There was more ebullition from water than from bare peat surfaces, and it was controlled by peat temperature, water level, atmospheric pressure and weekly temperature sum. However, the contribution of methane bubbles to the total ecosystem methane emission was small. This new information can be used to improve process models of peatland methane dynamics.
We studied methane emitted as episodic bubble release (ebullition) from water and bare peat...
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