Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2018-501
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2018-501
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 03 Jan 2019

Submitted as: research article | 03 Jan 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript is under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG).

Stand age and species composition effects on surface albedo in a mixedwood boreal forest

Mohammad Abdul Halim1,2, Han Y. H. Chen3, and Sean C. Thomas1 Mohammad Abdul Halim et al.
  • 1University of Toronto, Faculty of Forestry, 33 Willcocks Street, M5S 3B3, ON, Canada
  • 2Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Dept. of Forestry and Environmental Science, Sylhet-3114, Bangladesh
  • 3Lakehead University, Natural Resources Management, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, P7B 5E1, ON, Canada

Abstract. Surface albedo is one of the most important processes governing climate forcing in the boreal forest and is directly affected by management activities such as harvesting and natural disturbances such as forest fires. Empirical data on effects of these disturbances on boreal forest albedo are sparse. We conducted ground-based measurements of surface albedo from a series of instrument towers over four years in a replicated chronosequence of mixedwood boreal forest sites differing in stand age (year since disturbance) in both post-harvest and post-fire stands. We investigated the effects of stand age, canopy height, tree species composition, and ground vegetation cover on surface albedo through stand development. Our results indicate that winter and spring albedo values were 63 and 24 % higher, respectively, in post-harvest stands than in post-fire stands. Winter and summer albedos saturated at ~ 50 years of stand age in both post-harvest and post-fire stands. Albedo differences between post-harvest and post-fire stands were most pronounced during winter and spring in young stands (0–19 years post-disturbance). The proportion of deciduous broadleaf species showed a strong positive relationship with seasonal albedo in both post-harvest and post-fire stands. Given that stand composition in mixedwood boreal forests generally shows a gradual replacement of deciduous trees by conifers, our results suggest that successional changes in species composition are likely a key driver of age-related patterns in albedo. Our findings also suggest the efficacy of increasing the proportion of deciduous broadleaf species as a silvicultural option for climate-friendly management of boreal forest.

Mohammad Abdul Halim et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Mohammad Abdul Halim et al.
Mohammad Abdul Halim et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 404 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
328 72 4 404 2 1
  • HTML: 328
  • PDF: 72
  • XML: 4
  • Total: 404
  • BibTeX: 2
  • EndNote: 1
Views and downloads (calculated since 03 Jan 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 03 Jan 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 198 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 197 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 16 Sep 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Using field data collected over 4 years across a range of stand ages, we investigated how seasonal surface albedo in boreal forest varies with stand age, stand structure, and composition. Our results indicate that successional change in species composition is a key driver of age-related patterns in albedo, with hardwood species associated with higher albedo. The patterns described have important implications for both climate modelling and climate-smart boreal forest management.
Using field data collected over 4 years across a range of stand ages, we investigated how...
Citation