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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2018-347
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2018-347
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 07 Aug 2018

Submitted as: research article | 07 Aug 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Biogeosciences (BG) and is expected to appear here in due course.

Biogeography and community structure of abyssal scavenging Amphipoda (Crustacea) in the Pacific Ocean

Tasnim Patel1,2, Henri Robert1, Cedric D'Udekem D'Acoz3, Koen Martens1,2, Ilse De Mesel1, Steven Degraer1,2, and Isa Schön1,4 Tasnim Patel et al.
  • 1Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Operational Directorate Natural Environment, Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecology, Vautierstraat 29, 1000 Brussels, Gulledelle 100, 1000 Brussels and 3e en 23e linieregimentsplein, 8400 Oostende, Belgium
  • 2University of Ghent, Dept Biology, K. L. Ledeganckstraat 35, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
  • 3Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Operational Directorate Taxonomy & Phylogeny, Vautierstraat 29, 1000 Brussels, Belgium
  • 4University of Hasselt, Research Group Zoology, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium

Abstract. In 2015, we have collected more than 60,000 scavenging amphipod specimens during two expeditions to the Clarion-Clipperton fracture Zone (CCZ), in the Northeast (NE) Pacific and to the DISturbance and re-COLonisation (DisCOL) Experimental Area (DEA), a simulated mining impact disturbance proxy in the Peru basin, Southeast (SE) Pacific. Here, we compare biodiversity patterns of the larger specimens (> 15 mm) within and between these two oceanic basins. Nine scavenging amphipod species are shared between these two areas, thus indicating connectivity. We further provide evidence that disturbance proxies seem to negatively affect scavenging amphipod biodiversity, as illustrated by a reduced alpha biodiversity in the DEA (Simpson Index (D) = 0.62), when compared to the CCZ (D = 0.73) and particularly of the disturbance site in the DEA and the site geographically closest to it. Community compositions of the two basins differs, as evidenced by a Non-Metric Dimensional Scaling (NMDS) analysis of beta biodiversity. The NMDS also shows a further separation of the disturbance site (D1) from its neighbouring, undisturbed reference areas (D2, D3, D4 and D5) in the DEA. A single species, Abyssorchomene gerulicorbis, dominates the DEA with 60 % of all individuals.

Tasnim Patel et al.
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Tasnim Patel et al.
Tasnim Patel et al.
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Short summary
Exploitation of deep-sea resources in one of the largest ecosystems on the planet, have rendered research of its biodiversity more urgent than ever before. We investigated the impact of mining in the deep sea on amphipods, and now have important knowledge on the known habitats and connectivity of several species. We also demonstrate that a long-term disturbance experiment (Peru Basin) has had a detrimental impact on amphipod biodiversity, instrumental data for formulating sustainable policies.
Exploitation of deep-sea resources in one of the largest ecosystems on the planet, have rendered...
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