Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2018-22
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2018-22
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 01 Feb 2018

Submitted as: research article | 01 Feb 2018

Status
This preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Boreal forest soil is a significant and diverse source of volatile organic compounds

Mari Mäki1,2, Hermanni Aaltonen3, Jussi Heinonsalo3, Heidi Hellén3, Jukka Pumpanen4, and Jaana Bäck1,2 Mari Mäki et al.
  • 1Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research/Forest Sciences, Helsinki, 00560, Finland
  • 2Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, 00790, Finland
  • 3Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Helsinki, 00560, Finland
  • 4Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, 70600, Finland

Abstract. Vegetation emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are intensively studied world-wide because oxidation products of VOCs contribute to atmospheric processes, but the quantities by which different species of VOCs are produced by soil, or how effectively belowground VOCs are released into the atmosphere from soil remains largely unknown. This is the first published study that measures belowground VOC concentrations at different depths in a podzol combined with simultaneous soil surface flux measurements in a boreal coniferous forest. More than 50 VOCs, dominated by monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, were detected in the air space in the soil during the two measurement campaigns. Organic forest soil was a significant monoterpene source as it contained fresh isoprenoid-rich litter, and the concentrations of monoterpenes were comparable to the VOC concentrations in the air above the coniferous forest. Belowground monoterpene concentrations were largely decoupled from forest floor monoterpene fluxes; thus, it seems that production processes and storages of VOCs partly differ from those VOCs that are simultaneously emitted from the soil surface. Relatively high isoprenoid concentrations were measured under snow cover, which indicates that snow and ice cover hinders gas diffusion and causes belowground accumulation of VOCs when the activity of vegetation is very low.

This preprint has been withdrawn.
Mari Mäki et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Mari Mäki et al.
Mari Mäki et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 593 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
355 230 8 593 6 16
  • HTML: 355
  • PDF: 230
  • XML: 8
  • Total: 593
  • BibTeX: 6
  • EndNote: 16
Views and downloads (calculated since 01 Feb 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 01 Feb 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 562 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 561 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 21 Sep 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Withdrawal notice

This preprint has been withdrawn.

Short summary
Vegetation emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are intensively studied world-wide, but remains largely unknown how effectively belowground VOCs are produced and released into the atmosphere. We demonstrate that boreal forest soil is a diverse source and storage of VOCs, because more than 50 VOCs were detected in the soil air. Our results give evidence that VOC production processes and storages partly differ from those VOCs that are simultaneously emitted from the soil surface.
Vegetation emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are intensively studied world-wide,...
Citation