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https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2018-122
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2018-122
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 19 Mar 2018

Submitted as: research article | 19 Mar 2018

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This preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Lability of natural organic matter in freshwater: a simple method for detection using hydrogen peroxide as an indicator

Isabela Carreira Constantino, Amanda Maria Tadini, Marcelo Freitas Lima, Lídia Maria de Almeida Plicas, Altair Benedito Moreira, and Márcia Cristina Bisinoti Isabela Carreira Constantino et al.
  • São Paulo State University (UNESP), Instituto de Biociências, Letras e Ciências Exatas, Campus de São José do Rio Preto, Departamento de Química e Ciências Ambientais, R. Cristóvão Colombo 2265, 15054-000 São José do Rio Preto – SP, Brazil

Abstract. Natural organic matter (NOM) is an important component for understanding the behavior of pollutants in the environment. A fraction of NOM is considered labile, fresh and less oxidized. In this work, a simple method was developed to distinguish between labile (LOM) and recalcitrant (ROM) organic matter in freshwater samples. Pyruvate, lignin and fulvic acid were chosen as model compounds of labile and recalcitrant NOM. The samples were submitted to kinetic monitoring experiments using hydrogen peroxide. Pyruvate was the best standard for the quantification of LOM (for concetrations up to 2.9 mg L−1). ROM was quantified by measuring the difference between total organic carbon (TOC) and LOM concentrations. Curves obtained with 0.5 to 5.0 mg L−1 TOC (pyruvate) in freshwater or ultrapure water samples did not indicate the existence of a matrix effect. This simple method was applied to water samples that were collected monthly for one year; the resulting LOM concentrations ranged from 0.47 to 2.1 mg L−1 and the ROM concentrations ranged from 0.08 to 3.5 mg L−1. Based on this results we concluded that hydrogen peroxide kinetics can be used as a simple method to quantify LOM and ROM concentrations in freshwater samples.

This preprint has been withdrawn.
Isabela Carreira Constantino et al.
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Interactive discussion
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Status: closed
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Isabela Carreira Constantino et al.
Isabela Carreira Constantino et al.
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Short summary
The lability or recalcitrance of natural organic matter is key characteristic in dynamic of others entities present in aquatic systems, but there was not yet a direct method to quantification of labile (LOM) and recalcitrant (ROM) organic matter. The method proposed to quantify and ROM concentrations was developed using the hydrogen peroxide kinetic in freshwater samples. This method was employed in freshwater samples for one year and the results were related with seasonality.
The lability or recalcitrance of natural organic matter is key characteristic in dynamic of...
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