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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2017-555
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
12 Jan 2018
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG).
Interaction between elevated CO2 and phytoplankton-derived organic matter under solar radiation on bacterial metabolism from coastal waters
Antonio Fuentes-Lema1, Henar Sanleón-Bartolomé2, Luis M. Lubián3, and Cristina Sobrino1 1UVigo Marine Research Centre; Lagoas Marcosende Campus 36331 Vigo, Spain
2Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO). Paseo Marítimo Alcalde Francisco Vázquez 10, 15001 A Coruña, Spain
3Institute of Marine Sciences of Andalucía (CSIC). Campus Univ. Rio San Pedro. 11519 Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain
Abstract. Microcosm experiments to assess bacterioplankton response to phytoplankton-derived organic matter obtained under current and future-ocean CO2 levels were performed. Surface seawater enriched with inorganic nutrients was bubbled for 8 days with air (current CO2 scenario) or with a 1000 ppm CO2–air mixture (future CO2 scenario) under solar radiation. The organic matter produced under the current and future CO2 scenarios was subsequently used as inoculum. Triplicate 12 L flasks filled with 1.2 µm-filtered natural seawater enriched with the organic matter inocula were incubated in the dark for 8 days under CO2 conditions simulating current and future CO2 scenarios to study the bacterial response. The acidification of the media increased bacterial respiration at the beginning of the experiment while the addition of the organic matter produced under future levels of CO2 was related to changes in bacterial production and abundance. The balance between both, respiration and production, made that the bacteria grown under future CO2 levels with an addition of non-acidified matter showed the best growth efficiency at the end of the incubation. However cells grown under future scenarios with high CO2 levels and acidified organic matter additions did not perform differently than those grown under present CO2 conditions, independently of the addition of acidified or non-acidified organic matter. This study demonstrates that the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations can affect bacterioplankton directly by changes in the respiration rate and indirectly by changes on the organic matter with concomitant effects on bacterial production and abundance.

Citation: Fuentes-Lema, A., Sanleón-Bartolomé, H., Lubián, L. M., and Sobrino, C.: Interaction between elevated CO2 and phytoplankton-derived organic matter under solar radiation on bacterial metabolism from coastal waters, Biogeosciences Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2017-555, in review, 2018.
Antonio Fuentes-Lema et al.
Antonio Fuentes-Lema et al.
Antonio Fuentes-Lema et al.

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Short summary
In contrast to phytoplankton, ocean acidification (OA) effects on bacterioplankton are poorly understood. Microcosm experiments to assess bacterioplankton response to phytoplankton-derived organic matter obtained under current and future-ocean CO2 levels were performed. The results demonstrate that OA can affect bacterioplankton directly by changes in the respiration rate and indirectly by changes on the organic matter with concomitant effects on bacterial production and abundance.
In contrast to phytoplankton, ocean acidification (OA) effects on bacterioplankton are poorly...
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