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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2017-356
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2017-356
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 18 Sep 2017

Submitted as: research article | 18 Sep 2017

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG). The manuscript was not accepted for further review after discussion.

Influence of Tidal Inundation on CO2 Exchange between Salt Marshes and the Atmosphere

Hafsah Nahrawi1,2, Monique Y. Leclerc1, Gengsheng Zhang1, and Roshani Pahari1 Hafsah Nahrawi et al.
  • 1Atmospheric Biogeosciences Group, The University of Georgia, Griffin, 30223, USA
  • 2Faculty of Resource Science and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, Kota Samarahan, 94300, Malaysia

Abstract. Salt marshes are among the most productive and dynamic ecosystems on Earth and globally sequester an average of 210 g C m−2 yr−1. To understand the role of this ecosystem in the carbon cycle and its changes as a result of rapid climate change and human disturbance, a baseline record particularly on carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange between this ecosystem and atmosphere needs to be established. The goal of this study is to determine the effects tide events on the exchange of CO2 in a salt marsh ecosystem dominated by Spartina alterniflora using the eddy-covariance method near Sapelo Island, GA. Two eddy-covariance systems were set up in July 2013 to capture 10 Hz data of CO2. Results show that during daytime high tide events, a reduction of CO2 exchange was observed. The conditions with a high tide to vegetation ratio had smaller CO2 exchange when compared to conditions with a low tide ratio. Total daytime monthly reduction of CO2 exchange for August 2014 was 15 %. A greater total reduction of CO2 exchange of 40 % was recorded for high tide events with tide ratio of 0.75–1.0. In comparison of the effect of neap tide and spring tide on CO2 exchange, neap tide days showed a greater CO2 exchange as compared to spring tide days for May and October 2014, respectively. The inclusion of such results has implications to quantify the carbon budget and its changes as sea level rises.

Hafsah Nahrawi et al.
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Hafsah Nahrawi et al.
Hafsah Nahrawi et al.
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Short summary
Salt marsh is one of the most productive system on Earth. To understand the salt marsh-atmosphere CO2 exchange, it is important to consider the effect of tidal inundation in this ecosystem. Eddy-covariance systems were used to capture CO2. Results showed that, CO2 exchange was reduced by 40 % during high tide events in August 2014, despite only 10 % of the events occurred in that month. The inclusion of such results has implications to quantify the carbon budget and its changes as sea level rises.
Salt marsh is one of the most productive system on Earth. To understand the salt...
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