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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2017-304
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
10 Aug 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Biogeosciences (BG) and is expected to appear here in due course.
Soil solution phosphorus turnover: derivation, interpretation, and insights from a global compilation of isotope exchange kinetic studies
Julian Helfenstein1, Jannes Jegminat2, Timothy I. McLaren1, and Emmanuel Frossard1 1Institute of Agricultural Sciences, ETH Zürich, Lindau, 8315, Switzerland
2Institute of Neuroinformatics, University of Zürich and ETH Zürich, Zürich, 8057, Switzerland
Abstract. The exchange rate of inorganic phosphorus (P) between the soil solution and solid phase, also known as soil solution P turnover, is essential for describing the kinetics of bioavailable P. While soil solution P turnover (Km) can be determined by tracing radioisotopes in a soil-solution system, few studies have done so. We believe that this is due to a lack of understanding on how to derive Km from isotopic exchange kinetic (IEK) experiments, a widespread form of radioisotope dilution study. Here, we provide a derivation of calculating Km using parameters obtained from IEK experiments. We then calculated Km for 217 soils from published IEK experiments in terrestrial ecosystems, and also for that of 18 long-term P fertilizer field experiments. Analysis of the global compilation dataset revealed a negative relationship between concentrations of soil solution P and Km. Furthermore, Km buffered isotopically exchangeable P in soils with low concentrations of soil solution P. This finding was supported by an analysis of long-term P fertilizer field experiments, which revealed a negative relationship between Km and phosphate buffering capacity. Our study thus highlights the potential of Km for future studies – not only for P, but also for other environmentally-relevant, strongly-sorbing elements with radioisotopes such as zinc, cadmium, nickel, arsenic, or uranium.

Citation: Helfenstein, J., Jegminat, J., McLaren, T. I., and Frossard, E.: Soil solution phosphorus turnover: derivation, interpretation, and insights from a global compilation of isotope exchange kinetic studies, Biogeosciences Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2017-304, in review, 2017.
Julian Helfenstein et al.
Julian Helfenstein et al.
Julian Helfenstein et al.

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Short summary
Soil solution phosphorus (P) turnover is essential for describing the bioavailability of this important nutrient. Here, we provide a derivation of calculating soil solution P turnover using parameters obtained from isotope exchange kinetic experiments. We then calculated and analyzed soil solution P turnover for 217 soils and for 18 long-term P fertilizer field experiments worldwide. Our study thus provides important insights on P exchange kinetics in soils.
Soil solution phosphorus (P) turnover is essential for describing the bioavailability of this...
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