Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2017-230
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2017-230
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 09 Jun 2017

Research article | 09 Jun 2017

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG). The revised manuscript was not accepted.

An Orphan Problem Looking for Adoption: Responding to Ocean Acidification Utilising Existing International Institutions

Ellycia R. Harrould-Kolieb Ellycia R. Harrould-Kolieb
  • Australian-German Climate and Energy College, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3000, Australia

Abstract. Ocean acidification poses a substantial threat to the ocean, marine wildlife and the goods and services they provide. As a result it presents a substantial regulatory challenge at the international, regional, national and sub-national levels. In the international realms, ocean acidification is not currently addressed by any international instrument or stand-alone agreement, nor does there appear to be any coherent framework for responding to the issue. Despite this, there are a number of international institutions, including treaty bodies and specialised UN agencies that have expressed an interest in ocean acidification and have begun to initiate an array of relevant activities – a small number of which may be considered substantive activities, including rule-making and implementation.

This paper is an effort to explore the existing international frameworks that are applicable to forming a response to ocean acidification in an attempt to prevent worsening acidification and respond to impacts now and into the future. Six policy domains are outlined that together comprise a comprehensive response to ocean acidification. Each of these are then addressed with respect to what institutions are currently doing to respond to acidification and what could be done in the future.

This paper finds that only three international institutions have initiated substantive policy-making in response to ocean acidification with respect to the regulation of carbon capture and storage and the protection of species. While these are important policy interventions, they are simply not enough to prevent worsening ocean acidification or respond to the impacts resulting from increased acidity, even when coupled with policies, such as regulation of carbon dioxide under the UNFCCC that have been implemented without reference to ocean acidification. In order to fill the existing gaps, this paper proposes a series of, as yet un-utilized mechanisms that could be employed to enhance a response to ocean acidification.

Ellycia R. Harrould-Kolieb
Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Ellycia R. Harrould-Kolieb
Ellycia R. Harrould-Kolieb
Viewed  
Total article views: 384 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
286 82 16 384 1 14
  • HTML: 286
  • PDF: 82
  • XML: 16
  • Total: 384
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 14
Views and downloads (calculated since 09 Jun 2017)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 09 Jun 2017)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 380 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 377 with geography defined and 3 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 18 Dec 2018
Publications Copernicus
Special issue
Download
Short summary
This research finds that there is a dearth of policy making pertaining to ocean acidification at the international level. Indeed, only three institutions are found to have initiated rue-making or implementation activities with the goal of either preventing worsening acidification or responding to its impacts. In light of this, this paper proposes that there are a variety of institutions that could be utilized to enhance the international response to ocean acidification.
This research finds that there is a dearth of policy making pertaining to ocean acidification at...
Citation
Share