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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/bgd-11-1909-2014
© Author(s) 2014. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bgd-11-1909-2014
© Author(s) 2014. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 03 Feb 2014

Submitted as: research article | 03 Feb 2014

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG). The revised manuscript was not accepted.

Physical processes mediating climate change impacts on regional sea ecosystems

J. Holt1, C. Schrum2,3, H. Cannaby4,*, U. Daewel2,3, I. Allen5, Y. Artioli5, L. Bopp6, M. Butenschon5, B. A. Fach4, J. Harle1, D. Pushpadas2,3, B. Salihoglu4, and S. Wakelin1 J. Holt et al.
  • 1National Oceanography Centre, 6 Brownlow Street, Liverpool, L3 5DA, UK
  • 2Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Allegaten 41, 5007 Bergen, Norway
  • 3Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Thormøhlensgate 47, 5006 Bergen 31, Norway
  • 4Institute of Marine Sciences, METU, Erdemli MERSÝN, Turkey
  • 5Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Prospect Place, Plymouth, PL1 3DH, UK
  • 6Laboratoire des sciences du climat et de l'environnement (LSCE), IPSL, CEA-UVSQ-CNRS, UMR8212, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
  • *now at: National Oceanography Centre, 6 Brownlow Street, Liverpool, L3 5DA, UK

Abstract. Regional seas are exceptionally vulnerable to climate change, yet are the most directly societally important regions of the marine environment. The combination of widely varying conditions of mixing, forcing, geography (coastline and bathymetry) and exposure to the open-ocean makes these seas subject to a wide range of physical processes that mediates how large scale climate change impacts on these seas' ecosystems. In this paper we explore these physical processes and their biophysical interactions, and the effects of atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial change on them. Our aim is to elucidate the controlling dynamical processes and how these vary between and within regional seas. We focus on primary production and consider the potential climatic impacts: on long term changes in elemental budgets, on seasonal and mesoscale processes that control phytoplankton's exposure to light and nutrients, and briefly on direct temperature response. We draw examples from the MEECE FP7 project and five regional models systems using ECOSMO, POLCOMS-ERSEM and BIMS_ECO. These cover the Barents Sea, Black Sea, Baltic Sea, North Sea, Celtic Seas, and a region of the Northeast Atlantic, using a common global ocean-atmosphere model as forcing. We consider a common analysis approach, and a more detailed analysis of the POLCOMS-ERSEM model.

Comparing projections for the end of the 21st century with mean present day conditions, these simulations generally show an increase in seasonal and permanent stratification (where present). However, the first order (low- and mid-latitude) effect in the open ocean projections of increased permanent stratification leading to reduced nutrient levels, and so to reduced primary production, is largely absent, except in the NE Atlantic. Instead, results show a highly heterogeneous picture of positive and negative change arising from the varying mixing and circulation conditions. Even in the two highly stratified, deep water seas (Black and Baltic Seas) the increase in stratification is not seen as a first order control on primary production. The approaches to downscaled experiment design and lessons learned from the MEECE project are also discussed.

J. Holt et al.
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Interactive discussion
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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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J. Holt et al.
J. Holt et al.
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