Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
doi:10.5194/bg-2017-47
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
07 Mar 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG).
Ocean acidification increases the sensitivity and variability of physiological responses of an intertidal limpet to thermal stress
Jie Wang1, Yun-wei Dong1, Meng-wen Ding1, and Bayden Russell2 1State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, College of Ocean and Earth Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361000, China
2The Swire Institute of Marine Science and School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, 999077, China
Abstract. Understanding physiological responses of organisms to warming and ocean acidification is the first step towards predicting the potential population, community and ecological impacts of these stressors. Increasingly, physiological plasticity is being recognized as important for organisms to adapt to the changing microclimates. Here, we evaluate the importance of physiological plasticity for coping with ocean acidification and elevated temperature, and its variability among individuals from the same population, of the limpet Cellana toreuma. Heart rates (as a proxy for metabolic performance) and genes encoding heat-shock proteins were measured at different heat shock temperatures (26, 30, 34, 38 °C) in individuals acclimated under combinations of different pCO2 (400 ppm, 1000 ppm) and temperature (20 °C, 24 °C) regimes. Analysis of heart rate showed significantly higher temperature coefficients (Q10 rates) for limpets at 20 °C than at 24 °C and lower post-acclimation thermal sensitivity of limpets at 400 ppm than at 1000 ppm. hsp70 expression linearly increased with the increasing heat-shock temperatures, with the largest slope occurring in limpets under a future scenario (24 °C and 1000 ppm pCO2). These results suggested that limpets will have increased sensitivity and energy consumption under future conditions. Furthermore, the increased variation in physiological response under the future scenario indicated that some individuals were better to cope physiologically with these conditions. Therefore, while ocean acidification decreases the ability of many individuals to respond to thermal stress, physiological plasticity and variability seem to be crucial in allowing some intertidal animals to survive in a rapidly changing environment.

Citation: Wang, J., Dong, Y.-W., Ding, M.-W., and Russell, B.: Ocean acidification increases the sensitivity and variability of physiological responses of an intertidal limpet to thermal stress, Biogeosciences Discuss., doi:10.5194/bg-2017-47, in review, 2017.
Jie Wang et al.
Jie Wang et al.
Jie Wang et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 100 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
73 19 8 100 0 9

Views and downloads (calculated since 07 Mar 2017)

Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 07 Mar 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 100 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

Thereof 100 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.

Country # Views %
  • 1

Saved

Discussed

Latest update: 29 Mar 2017
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
To understand ecological impacts of CO2-induced ocean acidification and temperature rise, a key question is if organisms become more vulnerable under multiple stressors. Here we tested heart rate and gene expression levels of a limpet under different pCO2s and temperatures. Results showed that while many individuals are more vulnerable to heat stress under high CO2 and increased temperature, some animals have the ability to alter their physiology to help them survive under future conditions.
To understand ecological impacts of CO2-induced ocean acidification and temperature rise, a key...
Share